2014-11-28

Cape Cod Carol wins Aqueduct feature



The 5-year-old trained by Jim Ryerson and ridden by John Velazquez set the pace and held off Make the Moment by a nose. Cape Cod Carol improved to 6 for 31, paying $20, $6.60 and $2.90 as the longest price in the five-horse field

Make the Moment returned $4.50 and $2.70 while Frivolity paid $2.80 to show.

The time was 1:20.10 for 6 1/2 furlongs.




2014-11-28

Irish jump racing legend Dessie Hughes dies



Hughes rode Monksfield to win the 1979 Champion Hurdle and then sent out Hardy Eustace to claim the 2004 and 2005 editions of the hurdling crown as a trainer.

Fellow Irish trainer Henry de Bromhead described Hughes on Sunday as "a wonderful trainer, wonderful jockey and a wonderful man".

Gold Cup and Champion Hurdle winning jockey turned trainer Jonjo O'Neill tweeted: "So sad to hear of the passing of Dessie Hughes.

"We had some great tussles in the past and he was a lovely man."

Conor O'Dwyer, who rode Hardy Eustace in both his Champion Hurdle triumphs, said: "There's gentlemen and then there was Dessie Hughes.

"I've ridden for many good people during my career, but Dessie really stood out as a proper gentleman.

"We had some brilliant times together, some of the best times of my career. No one ever had a bad word to say about Dessie, and Dessie never had a bad word to say about anyone.

"He'd had some hard times, but he'd come through and seemed to be enjoying the best of his career. It's a sad day for everyone and for racing."

Hughes's career got off to a bumpy start when he rode his first winner at Tramore in 1962 only to be disqualified and placed last after a stewards inquiry.

His career took time to take off, but he went on to become one of Ireland's leading riders, claiming the 1977 Cheltenham Gold Cup on Davy Lad.

Two years later he powered Monksfield home in the Champion, the same season he took out a trainer's licence.

Hughes's last winner at Chelenham was Our Connor in last year's Triumph Hurdle.

Ironically given Hughes' great success in the race Our Connor suffered a fatal injury when competing in this year's Champion Hurdle.

At Cheltenham's meeting on Sunday a tribute was paid to Hughes, followed by a minute's silence. Jockeys riding at the meetings at Cheltenham, Cork and Punchestown are wearing black armbands.

Hughes's son, three-time British flat champion jockey Richard, spoke last month about the debt he owed his father.

"From the age of seven he has been tutoring me, advising me and helping me," Hughes junior told The Racing Post.

"He was always hard but fair.

"He would drum things into me, things like 'the last jockey who goes for his whip is the one who wins' and 'you win your race at the start not the end'.

"All his advice stood me in good stead. It has been instrumental in me becoming champion jockey. That I have got to the level I've reached is down to him and what he taught me."




2014-11-28

Irish jump racing legend Dessie Hughes dies



Hughes rode Monksfield to win the 1979 Champion Hurdle and then sent out Hardy Eustace to claim the 2004 and 2005 editions of the hurdling crown as a trainer.

Fellow Irish trainer Henry de Bromhead described Hughes on Sunday as "a wonderful trainer, wonderful jockey and a wonderful man".

Gold Cup and Champion Hurdle winning jockey turned trainer Jonjo O'Neill tweeted: "So sad to hear of the passing of Dessie Hughes.

"We had some great tussles in the past and he was a lovely man."

Conor O'Dwyer, who rode Hardy Eustace in both his Champion Hurdle triumphs, said: "There's gentlemen and then there was Dessie Hughes.

"I've ridden for many good people during my career, but Dessie really stood out as a proper gentleman.

"We had some brilliant times together, some of the best times of my career. No one ever had a bad word to say about Dessie, and Dessie never had a bad word to say about anyone.

"He'd had some hard times, but he'd come through and seemed to be enjoying the best of his career. It's a sad day for everyone and for racing."

Hughes's career got off to a bumpy start when he rode his first winner at Tramore in 1962 only to be disqualified and placed last after a stewards inquiry.

His career took time to take off, but he went on to become one of Ireland's leading riders, claiming the 1977 Cheltenham Gold Cup on Davy Lad.

Two years later he powered Monksfield home in the Champion, the same season he took out a trainer's licence.

Hughes's last winner at Chelenham was Our Connor in last year's Triumph Hurdle.

Ironically given Hughes' great success in the race Our Connor suffered a fatal injury when competing in this year's Champion Hurdle.

At Cheltenham's meeting on Sunday a tribute was paid to Hughes, followed by a minute's silence. Jockeys riding at the meetings at Cheltenham, Cork and Punchestown are wearing black armbands.

Hughes's son, three-time British flat champion jockey Richard, spoke last month about the debt he owed his father.

"From the age of seven he has been tutoring me, advising me and helping me," Hughes junior told The Racing Post.

"He was always hard but fair.

"He would drum things into me, things like 'the last jockey who goes for his whip is the one who wins' and 'you win your race at the start not the end'.

"All his advice stood me in good stead. It has been instrumental in me becoming champion jockey. That I have got to the level I've reached is down to him and what he taught me."




2014-11-28

Family reports Ohio State football player missing



Kosta Karageorge, a senior defensive tackle from Columbus, was last seen at his apartment around 2 a.m. Wednesday, his sister, Sophia Karageorge told The Columbus Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1zZXTgq). She said her 22-year-old brother apparently was upset, and roommates said he went for a walk, dressed in black from his hat to his boots.

Police said a missing-persons report was filed on the bearded, 6-foot-5, 285-pound former wrestler.

Team spokesman Jerry Emig confirmed that Karageorge missed practice Wednesday and Thursday.

Ohio State coach Urban Meyer described Karageorge as a hard worker and an important player in practice.

''Our thoughts continue to be with the family of Kosta Karageorge, and we pray that he is safe and that he is found soon,'' Meyer said in a Friday statement.

Karageorge, a former Buckeyes wrestler, joined the football team as a walk-on this season. He has played in one game and is among two dozen seniors slated to be recognized at their final home game Saturday against rival Michigan.

Karageorge's sister said he left without his wallet or his motorcycle. He has a history of concussions, including one a month ago, and might have become disoriented, she said.

''We're very concerned that he's not himself and that he maybe doesn't know what's going on,'' she told the newspaper. She said after each concussion, he has followed trainers' instructions and received proper care, but ''his repercussions from (concussions) have been long-term or delayed.''

The team's physician, Dr. Jim Borchers, said Friday that he could not comment on the medical care of student athletes.

But, Boarches said, ''We are confident in our medical procedures and policies to return athletes to participation following injury or illness.''
The Dispatch reports that about 100 people gathered Friday afternoon in Columbus to post fliers with the player's photo and description.




2014-11-28

Family reports Ohio State football player missing



Kosta Karageorge, a senior defensive tackle from Columbus, was last seen at his apartment around 2 a.m. Wednesday, his sister, Sophia Karageorge told The Columbus Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1zZXTgq). She said her 22-year-old brother apparently was upset, and roommates said he went for a walk, dressed in black from his hat to his boots.

Police said a missing-persons report was filed on the bearded, 6-foot-5, 285-pound former wrestler.

Team spokesman Jerry Emig confirmed that Karageorge missed practice Wednesday and Thursday.

Ohio State coach Urban Meyer described Karageorge as a hard worker and an important player in practice.

''Our thoughts continue to be with the family of Kosta Karageorge, and we pray that he is safe and that he is found soon,'' Meyer said in a Friday statement.

Karageorge, a former Buckeyes wrestler, joined the football team as a walk-on this season. He has played in one game and is among two dozen seniors slated to be recognized at their final home game Saturday against rival Michigan.

Karageorge's sister said he left without his wallet or his motorcycle. He has a history of concussions, including one a month ago, and might have become disoriented, she said.

''We're very concerned that he's not himself and that he maybe doesn't know what's going on,'' she told the newspaper. She said after each concussion, he has followed trainers' instructions and received proper care, but ''his repercussions from (concussions) have been long-term or delayed.''

The team's physician, Dr. Jim Borchers, said Friday that he could not comment on the medical care of student athletes.

But, Boarches said, ''We are confident in our medical procedures and policies to return athletes to participation following injury or illness.''
The Dispatch reports that about 100 people gathered Friday afternoon in Columbus to post fliers with the player's photo and description.